Bitter Memory

Many affected harbor bitter a memory about government letting them down in their inertia to declaring a state of emergency.

Many affected harbor a bitter memory about initial inertia by politicians at all levels of government in declaring a state of emergency to unfolding flooding crisis.

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Many affected harbor bitter a memory about how slow authorities reacted initially to the need for pre-emptive, preventative work by blue-collar work crews, lack of prepared sandbags in municipal depots for emergencies like this one, and especially being very late in calling for military help.

Victims who already lost their homes have a genuine reason to feel angry for their devastating loss despite reluctantly acknowledging their very own fault having houses in known flood zones.

Overwhelmingly they feel the government let them down in not intervening quicker, declaring an emergency as things unfolded, and calling in the army earlier to help out.

Today anyone can speculate about what could have, should have, been done now after so much flooding because sandbags were not prepared, delivered early, and placed to prevent water inundation in homes however, looking at the big picture it seems obvious initial inertia by politicians at all levels of government certainly contributed substantially to what happened.

Many regions continue to remain on flood alert as rain continues to fall on saturated ground while rivers around Quebec and Ontario already reaching dangerously high levels and flooding most low-lying areas may finally begin to subside perhaps, by the middle of this week if the rain actually stops.

More rain is forecasted however, that is yet to be seen because this last weekend, ending yesterday, gave everyone a bit of respite when a tiny amount of sun peered through the heavy cloud cover buffeted by gusty cool winds and the rain stopped.

Monday, May 8, 2017 is overcast with ice crystals falling at times, this is not a huge amount of rain in whatever form it comes down however, because it will be falling on very saturated land even relatively small amounts could cause more problems.

My picture taken yesterday, Sunday, May 7th depicts flooded Pierrefonds boulevard, the place looks like a scene taken at water’s edge of Riviere-des-Prairies, the back river nearby (about a block or two away from the boulevard) that has overflowed causing this flood.

I took this long distance digital image from a hill on rue René-Émard (street) overlooking the scene, this is a street which runs north-south parallel with boulevard Saint Jean, a main street about one block further west also underwater at its junction with Pierrefonds boulevard.

What you see at the horizon is part of Pierrefonds municipal garage and warehouse behind a light gray colored sheet metal corrugated fence bordered by trees on right and flooded Pierrefonds boulevard running past both with two half-submerged parked cars a bit in the foreground.

The borough of Pierrefonds is in Montreal’s West Island and Pierrefonds boulevard is a main street running east to west for about 9.3 km skirting the northern edge of the Island.

Even before this picture was taken Montreal’s municipal authorities and the Quebec and Canadian governments have declared a state of emergency allowing all measures and resources like military assistance, needed to be employed, they expect it to last past next weekend when things should improve.

This is my contribution for WP single word prompt:”BITTER”.

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